The Louisville Herald, Inc.

Louisville, Ohio Real News Since 1887

rocci front page
New to Louisville?

Executive Order Signed 

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has signed the following Executive Order:

Executive Order 2021-01D: Implementing Fiscal Year 2021 Budget Reductions to Balance the Biennial Budget While Partially Restoring Fiscal Year 2021 Education Payments

Additionally, Governor DeWine issued the following statement: 

“In the springtime, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the global economy, and on Ohio’s revenues, was dire.  With this, reductions were made to the state’s biennial budget. 

“With this Executive Order, we are finalizing current year budget reductions at $390 million across all agencies, which is less than the cuts implemented last year. 

“Because the cuts implemented today are less than last year’s reductions, OBM Director Murnieks is authorized to allot to the Department of Education an additional $160 million; and to the Department of Higher Education an additional $100 million of enacted fiscal year 2021 General Revenue Fund appropriations previously withheld.

“As many schools, colleges and universities return to in-person learning, it’s important that the funding be reinstated.”

obsolete trusted

Town Crier

Feb. 2: Groundhog Day

Feb. 15: Presidents Day

Feb. 25: Virtual public meeting to discuss the proposed US30 relocation project on US 30 in East Canton. https://publicinput.com/S4171 or call 855-925-2801 and enter code 1003.

Jan. 27: Annual Louisville Area Chamber of Commerce meeting via Zoom. Registration on the Chamber website - www.louisvilleohchamber.org.

article image
DAVID WHITEHILL

ArtsinStark Appoints David Whitehill President and CEO

CANTON, OH. – The ArtsinStark Board of Directors announced today it has hired David Whitehill of Asheville, N.C., as the organization’s next President and CEO.

Whitehill spent the last eight years as Executive Director of the Asheville Symphony, one of the nation’s most progressive orchestras among its peers and the largest employer of the performing arts in the 17-county Western North Carolina region. Before taking the position in Asheville, Whitehill led arts organizations in Bangor, Maine, and Orange County, California. He will begin the ArtsinStark position on February 1.

A 10-member search committee made up of ArtsinStark Board members along with cultural and community leaders, made the recommendation to hire Whitehill at a meeting earlier this month.

As President and CEO of ArtsinStark, Whitehill will serve as an arts and culture leader for the region and is charged with using the arts to create smarter kids, new jobs and healthier communities. He will oversee the renovation of the Canton Cultural Center for the Arts and the redevelopment of its 16-acre campus. Whitehill will lead the Annual Arts Campaign that supports Stark County’s seven largest arts groups and 900 small non-profits, artists and schools. He will also collaborate with a variety of local organizations including the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce and Visit Canton to expand and build programs and partnerships.

“Stark County is full of creative and energetic people who have worked together to develop the greater Canton region into a cultural hub, thanks in part to the leadership of a forward-thinking arts council,” Whitehill said. “ArtsinStark has made a deep commitment to investing in the health and well-being of the county’s greatest cultural assets – its makers and creators. The world has changed, and the frameworks we draw upon must change as well. A new window of opportunity is opening, and I am excited to guide ArtsinStark at this time in its history.”

Whitehill, who was named one of Musical America’s Top 30 Professionals in the Performing Arts in 2019, began initiatives including the Asheville Amadeus festival that celebrates creativity within the region by bringing together more than 30 organizations and businesses in music, dance, food, beer, art, theatre and more; developed education programs including MusicWorks an afterschool program for underserved and low-income elementary school students and The Beat Bach Symphonies a virtual education songwriting and storytelling program in response to Covid-19 school closures; and started the widely acclaimed IDEASOUND recording initiative and audience engagement project thatworks to dissolve barriers between musical genresincluded a collaboration with Grammy Award winners Steep Canyon Rangers and Boyz II Men.

He was a founding member of the Asheville Music Professionals Board of Directors and served on the Buncombe County Schools Arts Advisory Council, and the City of Asheville Civic Center Commission. He has also served on the national board of the League of American Orchestras.

Whitehill is married and has an 8-year-old daughter.

Whitehill assumes the role of President and CEO from Robb Hankins, who announced his departure in September 2020. “This has been an amazing 15-year run,” says Hankins, “and my wife Claudette and I are so grateful to the wonderful people of Canton and Stark County, Ohio.” Among his accomplishments, Hankins grew the Annual Arts Campaign from $900,000 to $1.7 million, while taking it to goal for 15 years in a row. He also created the Canton Arts District with First Fridays, established the SmArts Program in the schools, promoted community development through 2020 Vision, and led the way for the arts to be a driver for local tourism. “I just wanted to show people how art and creativity could make a real difference, not just in Canton, but all across the county,” said Hankins. “It has been an honor to work in such an amazing place and I know that great things are coming in the future.”

About ArtsinStark

ArtsinStark uses the arts to create smarter kids, new jobs, and healthier communities. It is the 50-year-old private, non-profit organization that gives out grants, owns and manages the Cultural Center, and runs the Annual Arts Campaign --- and much more (Canton Arts District, First Fridays, SmArts Program, the Genius Project, 20/20 Vision, the ELEVEN, and the Canton Music Block). Its annual budget is $3 million. What it doesn’t earn, it raises each spring through the Annual Arts Campaign.  In 2020 ArtsinStark raised $1.66 million for the Annual Arts Campaign to become the only united arts fund drive in America to ever make goal for 15 years in a row. 

article image

Gabby Smith will play soccer for Mt. Union

 

Louisville High School senior Gabnby Smith will continue her soccer career at Mt. Union. She recently signed her Letter of Intent. LHS Girls Soccer Head Coach John Henkel remarked about Gabby: “Gabby is an outstanding young player leader and positive role model and Mount Union is a great fit for both. She always gives 100% in the classroom in the weight room and on the field.” Gabby, (seated) with her parents Jason and Stacy Smith, and in back her sister Olivia.   (HERALD PHOTO)

Town Crier

Jan. 18: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Jan. 20: Inauguration Day

Feb. 2: Groundhog Day

Feb. 15: Presidents Day

Feb. 25: Virtual public meeting to discuss the proposed US30 relocation project on US 30 in East Canton. https://publicinput.com/S4171 or call 855-925-2801 and enter code 1003.

Jan. 27: Annual Louisville Area Chamber of Commerce meeting via Zoom. Registration on the Chamber website - www.louisvilleohchamber.org.

City of Louisville and Louisville Public Library Continue Discussions Regarding Utilization of Downtown Green Space

LOUISVILLE, OHIO – (Dec. 3, 2020) – Continued discussions surrounding the future of the downtown Louisville “green space” have proven fruitful for The City of Louisville Administration, Members of City Council and the Louisville Public Library Board of Trustees and Administration. The two groups kicked off exploratory meetings in early November to consider a joint development project for the open “green space” located in the northern section of downtown Louisville and have met regularly since. 

The entities recently crafted a joint vision statement for the space to ensure focus and alignment of future meetings and discussions. The collective vision of the exploratory planning team is to, “consider the advancement of the green space to further promote mixed-use (residential, incubator, business) development of the downtown area while considering the inclusion of shared space and infrastructure for municipal (city) and library. Additionally, to create a park area to be used for community events with an outdoor amphitheater on the green.” 

“I am excited that both groups share a common vision and a common set of goals for the green space area,” said City Manager Larry Collins. “We are approaching this potential initiative from many angles to ensure no stone is left unturned – the progress thus far is encouraging.”  

In the coming weeks, the planning group hopes to offer residents a visual rendering of the concepts in consideration. While no specific decisions have been made regarding a potential structure, officials feel it is vital for community members to have a sense of the project’s scope. Additionally, the gathering of community feedback remains an essential component to the project’s eventual success. A widescale community engagement initiative is planned for January and February, where residents can offer specific feedback and ask questions. “While there is still much work to do and further research to consider, I am happy with the focus and discussions that have occurred during the planning sessions,” said Library Director, Brock Hutchison. “We will continue to have dialogue while staying true to the agreed upon project vision.”

The focus of future planning sessions will include project financing options (including grants and partnerships), widespread study of neighboring communities who have successfully completed similar projects and the consideration of ongoing operating expenses should a new shared facility come to fruition. “Both the City and Library are committed to making this a no new tax initiative, said Collins.” There are creative ways to potentially finance such projects that will not require additional burden on our residents – we want this to be clear from the beginning.” 

Discussions for the project were originally prompted by community feedback that was provided to both entities during recent strategic planning efforts as well as the Downtown Louisville Action Plan, which was adopted by City Council in September. The plan prioritizes projects in the downtown area with the goals of creating and sustaining a quality commercial base, expanding social connections by building a sense of community through shared spaces and defining and creating an image that reflects the values and vision of the Louisville Community. The full Louisville Downtown Action Plan can be found on the city’s website.  

The two entities plan to meet again in mid-December, the last scheduled meeting before the new year. 

2021 Stick-on Calendars at the Herald

 

The Herald received their shipment of stick-on calendars for the new year and they are available for free for up to 3, for Herald visitors. The Herald is open 9:30-5 M-F. They make good stocking stuffers.

City of Louisville and Louisville Public Library Begin Discussions Regarding Future of Downtown Green Space

LOUISVILLE, OHIO – (Nov. 12, 2020) – The City of Louisville Administration, Members of City Council and the Louisville Public Library Board and Administration recently engaged in preliminary discussions regarding a joint development project for the open “green space” located in the northern section of downtown Louisville.  

“We appreciate the Library Board and Administration for their willingness to begin discussions regarding the future of the green space,” said City Manager Larry Collins. This collaboration is an important step in considering the continued revitalization of our downtown area. The green space is a central component of the conversation as we envision a vibrant downtown that will benefit the residents of Louisville for generations to come.”

The discussions were prompted by the Downtown Louisville Action Plan, which was adopted by City Council in September. The plan prioritizes projects in the downtown area with the goals of creating and sustaining a quality commercial base, expanding social connections by building a sense of community through shared spaces and defining and creating an image that reflects the values and vision of the Louisville Community.

The Louisville Public Library currently owns a majority of the parcels that are commonly referred to by residents as the “green space.” There have been multiple considerations for use of the property in the past, none of which have come to fruition. However, a joint collaboration between City and Library has not been fully and completely explored until the recent meeting. “Utilization of the green space is an important conversation in our community, one that has been studied deeply through data gleaned from multiple community engagement initiatives,” said Brock Hutchison, Director of the Louisville Public Library. “We feel continued discussions with the City regarding future use of the property are in the Library’s best interests for the future.”

The two entities are scheduled to meet again to continue discussions in the coming weeks and further public community conversations are planned as part of the discovery process. “As these conversations continue, we want to keep our community informed and updated with our ideas and our progress,” said Collins. “We truly believe that a potential collaboration could greatly benefit the City and its future, while maximizing efficiency and decreasing taxpayer burden.”

The full Louisville Downtown Action Plan can be found on the city’s website homepage, www.louisvilleohio.com

Town Crier

Nov. 11: Veterans Day

Nov. 26: Thanksgiving

Scherer & Patterson Announce Press Conference on School Funding Bill

COLUMBUS — State Representatives John Patterson (D-Jefferson) and Gary Scherer (R-Circleville) will hold a press conference next week to discuss legislation pertaining to Ohio’s school funding.
 
Substitute House Bill 305 would provide a comprehensive revision of Ohio’s primary and secondary school funding system. The original version of the bill was introduced in the spring of 2019 after more than 18 months of work led by 16 active Ohio educators under the direction of recently elected Speaker of the House Bob Cupp and Patterson.
 
WHAT:          Press conference to discuss Sub. HB 305: legislation to provide a comprehensive revision of Ohio’s primary and secondary school funding system
 
WHEN:          11:00 AM
                                                                          
WHERE:        Ohio Statehouse, The Crypt
                         1 Capitol Square, Columbus, OH 43215
 
The press conference will be live streamed by the Ohio Channel. Visit www.ohiochannel.org to watch the press conference online.

AG Yost's Robocall Enforcement Unit warns of potential scam calls and texts 

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — An anti-robocall initiative launched six months ago by Attorney General Dave Yost has empowered Ohioans to report 27,931 illegal robocalls in an effort to help the Attorney General fight back against the growing nuisance. In turn, the Robocall Enforcement Unit has analyzed and shared the incoming data to try to put a stop to these illegal calls and texts, including filing a lawsuit to stop this behavior in June.
In March 2020, the Robocall Enforcement Unit – part of Yost’s Consumer Protection Section dedicated to rooting out bad actors at every level of the robocall industry – launched with the slogan, “Just don’t answer,” designed to encourage Ohioans to not answer or reply to phone numbers they do not recognize.
Today, AG Yost reminds consumers, whether the call is a robocall or if it has a live person on the other line, the best advice to follow continues to be just don’t answer. Other general tips to help combat robocalls include:
• Never interact with a suspected scam robocaller in any way.
• Avoid providing personal or financial information by phone.
• Carefully review terms and conditions when opting-in on websites that request a telephone number. 
• Register your phone number with the Do Not Call Registry online at DoNotCall.gov or by phone at 1-888-382-1222. However, know that political and polling/research calls from live callers are generally permitted as exceptions to the Do Not Call laws but robocalls to mobile numbers require prior express consent.
• Research services offered by your phone provider or apps to block unwanted calls.
“Scammers follow the news and create variations of common scams based on current events,” Yost said. “Among other things, the public should be on guard for scams related to COVID, charitable donations, and the upcoming election in an attempt to defraud them of personal information and money through robocalls and text messages.”
Earlier this year, a Delaware County woman contacted the Attorney General claiming that a scammer called pretending to be her grandson and asked her to send money so he could get home because he was stuck out-of-state due to the pandemic. Another Ohio resident reported a fraudulent text message directing her to click a special link to “accept” her COVID-19 stimulus payment. In other instances, scammers have claimed to represent government agencies in an attempt to gain bank account information under the guise of needing such data for a COVID-19 stimulus payment.
Scammers are always ready to take advantage of peoples’ generosity. Scammers may call or text posing as charitable organizations and ask for donations – possibly for COVID-relief or research, or even hurricane-relief funds. In reality, the money only goes to line the scammer’s pockets.
To avoid potential charitable scams, follow these tips:
• Do not assume that charity recommendations on social media sites have already been vetted. Donors should see if charities are registered with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office by clicking here.
• Be cautious of “look-alike” websites and charities with names that sound similar to well-known organizations. Sometimes they are simply intended to confuse donors.
• Watch out for emotional appeals. Scammers know it just takes a click to donate online and can capitalize on the convenience and spirit of giving with fake pictures and stories.
• Donors can also check the following resources to learn more about specific charities: IRS Select Check, BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator, and GuideStar.
As scammers tailor their schemes to reflect the news of the day, Ohioans should expect similar ploys involving the upcoming election and voting.
“Our nation’s enemies are working hard to disrupt our election, and others may be using it to line their own pockets by attempting to scam voters,” said Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose. “Don’t fall for it. Do your due diligence. Your vote matters, so make sure you get your information about the election from trusted sources.”
To avoid potential election-related scams, follow these tips:
•Only utilize trusted websites from county boards of elections or the Secretary of State’s VoteOhio.gov website for information about voter registration, polling locations, absentee voting, and much more. 
•Know that most legitimate government websites end in .gov or .us, while most political/non-profit organizations’ websites end in .org or .com.
• If you’re voting by mail, track your ballot at VoteOhio.gov/Track
• If you want to report potential disinformation about election administration, send an e-mail to [email protected]
• Don’t feel pressure to donate to any political organization without finding out more about the group to ensure it’s legitimate. Never donate via gift cards, wire transfer or prepaid money card – the preferred payment methods of scammers.
Yost continues to urge Ohioans to report calls to the Robocall Enforcement Unit by texting “ROBO” to 888111 and answering a set of questions that take less than a minute to complete. Consumers also can file complaints by visiting OhioProtects.org or calling 1-800-282-0515. Even if a robocall does not cause a financial loss, reporting it to the unit can help investigators identify trends and protect other Ohioans from becoming victims. 

The Louisville Herald, Inc.
308 S. Mill St., PO Box 170
Louisville, OH 44641
(330) 875-5610
Open 9–5 M–F

NFIB represents the interest of small and independent business owners before federal and state legislative and executive branches of government. As a matter of policy, NFIB does not endorse or promote the products and services of its members.
LOUISVILLE WEATHER
<a href='http://www.free-sudoku.com'>Sudoku</a>

All information submitted to The Louisville Herald is for use solely by The Herald and will not be sold or transmitted to any other entity. The price of a subscription includes a $10 non-refundable circulation administrative fee. If a subscription is canceled, a refund will be based on the pro-rated weeks remaining in the subscription, less the $10 fee. All subscriptions are for a weekly newspaper.